Is your Cholesterol level to high? About half of all American adults have cholesterol levels categorized as high. That means there’s a high probability that yours may just be higher than you think.

So if you haven’t had yours checked recently, don’t ignore it any further. Why? Because heart-related diseases are the number one killer of both men and women in America and most other industrialized countries. And most are traceable to high cholesterol.

If your fears are confirmed and you do have high cholesterol, do not panic, it can easily be taken care of, especially when detected early enough. Naturally your doctor may put you on cholesterol-lowering prescriptions, mostly medications. Obey them. But more importantly, pay special attention to the tips contained in this article you’re reading.

Because research has shown that by eating the right types of food, getting sufficient exercise, and generally taking good care of yourself, you could cut your risk of dying from cholesterol-induced diseases by more than 80 percent.

But first, let’s tell you a little about cholesterol. There’s nothing mysterious about them. Put simply, cholesterol is that wax-looking substance that is naturally produced by the body—found in both humans and animals.

They are of two types—the High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL, considered as the good cholesterol) and the Low-Density Lipoprotein, or LDL (the “bad” cholesterol).

The quantity and type of it produced will depend on the type of foods you eat and your metabolic rate. The LDL type takes cholesterol into your arteries. Over time, the quantity accumulates, clogging the arteries and eventually leading to heart attacks, strokes and so on.

On the other hand, the HDL category carries cholesterol away from the arteries and takes it to your liver where it’s disposed off in form of bile.

Now, if you have a high cholesterol level, the first thing you’ll need to do is to watch your diet. Numerous findings have proven that by eliminating or at least drastically limiting the foods you eat that contain saturated fats, trans fats, dietary cholesterol, and refined carbohydrates, you’d almost certainly drive down your cholesterol levels by an incredible 90 percent.

Saturated fats are found in most animal-based foods, such as meats, butter, and whole-milk dairy products like yogurt, cheese, and ice cream. Poultry skin and palm oil are also high in saturated fats. Studies have shown that replacing saturated fat with monounsaturated types of fat such as olive oil or nuts will drastically reduce the accumulation of the bad (i.e. LDL) cholesterol.

Cholesterol-rich diets include egg yolks, shellfish, liver, and other organ meats. It’s true that this category of fats does not harm the body as much as Trans fats and saturated fats. Still, if you truly want to maintain a firm hold on your cholesterol level, it’s good to avoid or drastically limit your consumption of these food items.

Then there are trans fats. These are found in most factory-processed foods—margarines, most baked goods, potato chips, snacks, fried foods, and fast foods. Calorie for calorie, trans fats are even more dangerous that the other two types discussed earlier. It’s been calculated that a single serving of French fries contains some 45 calories worth of LDL cholesterol.

Guess what happens when you make that a part of your daily diet? You’d have succeeded in doubling your chances of developing a heart disease in just a matter of time! So in truth, there’s no safe amount of trans fats permissible for anybody aiming to lower their cholesterol level.

But reducing your cholesterol level is not limited to things to avoid. There are of course things you would have to do—food types to choose from and lifestyle changes to make.

REMEMBER YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT!

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To your Good Health,

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